WEEK
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
1
3 Km
Rest
3 Km
3 Km
Cross T or Rest
6 Km
Cross T or Rest
2
3 Km
Rest
4.5 Km
3 Km
Cross T or Rest
6 Km
Cross T or Rest
3
3 Km
Rest
4.5 Km
3 Km
Cross T or Rest
8 Km
Cross T or Rest
4
3 Km
Rest
4.5 Km
3 Km
Cross T or Rest
11 Km
Cross T or Rest
5
4.5 Km
Rest
6 Km
4.5 Km
Cross T or Rest
6 Km
Cross T or Rest
6
4.5 Km
Rest
8 Km
4.5 Km
Cross T or Rest
16 km
Cross T or Rest
7
4.5 Km
Rest
6 Km
4.5 Km
Cross T or Rest
17.5 km
Cross T or Rest
8
6 Km
Rest
8 Km
4.5 Km
Cross T or Rest
12.5 km
Cross T or Rest
9
4.5 Km
Rest
6 Km
4.5 Km
Cross T or Rest
16 km
Cross T or Rest
10
6 Km
Rest
6 Km
4.5 Km
Cross T or Rest
13 Km
Cross T or Rest
11
4.5 Km
Rest
6 Km
4.5 Km
Cross T or Rest
9.5 km
Cross T or Rest
12
4.5 Km
Rest
3-4.5 Km
Rest
15-20 min easy
Rest
Race Day

NOTE

1. This is 12 Week Training Plan, plan out before the race day.

2. The schedule is a guide—it is not an absolute. Rearrange days on which you run or walk to what best fits your schedule.

3. The schedule shows kms, but you can run or walk for time as well if you do not have measured courses where you normally train. In other words, if you run or walk 13 Km and you are scheduled for 6 kms, stay out for 36 minutes. If you don’t know what your pace per mile is, use 10 min/km as the standard for runners and 18 min/km for walkers.

4. Runners-you don’t need to run the entire time you’re training! Taking walk breaks is a great way to extend the distance you can comfortably complete. Experiment with different run/walk ratios to find the one that works best for you. For example, start with a 5-10 minute warm up walk, then run for a set time, walk for a set time, and continue that pattern throughout your run. The important thing to remember is to start taking your walk breaks early, before you reach the point of exhaustion.

5. The key events each week are the long runs and walks and rest days. Long runs and walks build gradually to give you the endurance you need to finish the race. Rest and easy days are critical to allow your body to recover from the training build-up. The remaining events during the week serve as your base and will help you get through the long distances more comfortably with less chance of injury.

6. If you are currently running or walking more than what the schedule calls for in the beginning, simply maintain what you are doing until the schedule catches up.

7. The schedule includes a 4 days of running or walking, 2 days of rest, and 1 day of cross training. Cross training is other forms of exercise which will help improve or maintain cardiovascular fitness while giving your feet and legs a break from the pounding of running and walking. Swimming and biking are good cross training activities.